Policies and Prevention Actions in Korea - Red-light districts turning from places for sexual exploitation into spaces for reflection on women's human rights
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  • Red-light districts turning from places for sexual exploitation into spaces for reflection on women's human rights
  • 조회 수: 81  / 등록일:  2018-07-04
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    Photo Credit: Daegu Junggu





    Red-light districts turning from places for sexual exploitation into spaces for reflection on

    women’s human rights

     


    Red-light districts, which have long symbolized sexual exploitation, are being reborn as unique spaces through the efforts of local communities. Three examples are featured here. The communities presented have all compounded their innovations through mutual cooperation and learning.

     

    1. ‘Seonmichon’ in Jeonju

    With the goal of redeveloping the Seonmichon red-light district while expanding the protection of the human rights and rehabilitation of prostituted women, the Private-Public Seonmichon Renewal Council was launched in February 2014. In 2015, the Jeonju metropolitan government adopted “cultural revival” as the direction for its urban renewal efforts with an aim to convert the area into a place for human rights and communication while remembering history. The Jeonbuk Women’s Human Rights Support Center has been conducting a range of activities including a walking tour of the Seonmichon neighborhood, story collection, and an exhibition of records on the area. In 2017, the non-profit organization held an exhibition in the red-light district entitled the Re-born Project in partnership with six artists so that citizens could come and witness the process of its rebirth. On March 21 of this year, the Special Committee to Support Women’s Human Rights from the Suwon City Council visited Jeonju City Hall, the Jeonbuk Women’s Human Rights Support Center, and the Seonmichon red-light district itself in order to apply this case as a benchmark before launching a similar project in the red-light district near Suwon Station.  

     

    2.Jagal Madang’ in Daegu

    Jagal Madang was once one of the most infamous red-light districts in South Korea. In 2016, the Taskforce for the Removal/Gentrification of Inappropriate Facilities in Downtown Dowon-dong was created with a goal of establishing an ordinance on rehabilitation support for victimized women and to launch a Jagal Madang renewal project. The Daegu Women’s Human Rights Center, a support organization for prostituted victims, began the Jagal Madang Memory and Transformation Project in 2016. The project consists of a range of activities including recording the history of Jagal Madang, art exhibitions, and a talk event, attracted significant attention and participation from local citizens and artists. In October 2017, the Jung-gu Office in Daegu remodeled a brothel in the red-light district to create the Jagal Madang Art Space as part of its continued efforts to convert the area into a place celebrating women’s human rights together with civic participation and the arts. Starting on April 25, the Jagal Madang Art Space is holding an installation art exhibition on the theme of healing. This exhibition will continue until September 16.  

     

    3. ‘Jangmi Maeul’ in Asan

    The Jangmi Maeul red-light district in Asan, Chungcheongnam-do Province, became a red-light district with a number of hot springs businesses converted into entertainment bars. The Asan City government implemented crackdowns on the red-light district through 2017. In 2015, the Asan City government established a plan to close Jangmi Maeul based on collected citizens’ ideas for the renewal of the red-light district. The closure project was launched in earnest in April 2016 and the city passed an ordinance on rehabilitation support for prostituted victims in March 2017 as a means to help victimized women secure a stable livelihood, housing, and vocational training. The red-light district is currently being transformed into a space for business startups by young entrepreneurs, a women’s human rights center, and artists’ workshops. According to the Asan City government, the closure of the red-light district entered its final stage in April of this year.  

     


    Sources:

    1. WHRIK, The Answers Are in the Field, 2017. 

    2. WHRIK, Women and Human Rights, Issue 17, 2017.

    3. The Segye Times, The transformation of a red-light district: Out of the darkness and into an open space for human rights and culture, April 13, 2018.

    4. The NSP News Agency, The Special Committee to Support Women’s Human Rights of the Suwon City Council visits the Seonmichon red-light district in Jeonju, March 22, 2018.

    5. The Hankyorhe, An exhibition of healing held at the Jagal Madang red-light district in Daegu, April 20, 2018.

    6. The Chungnam Ilbo, The Closure of Jangmi Maeul in Asan enters the final stage: three more entertainment bars removed, only two remain, April 11, 2018.


    Note: The article which is written in Korea is attached as a separate file in this posting (see attached)

    본 내용에 대한 한글 원문은 첨부파일을 확인하여 주시기 바랍니다.



     

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